AOL: Another reorg for sales organization

AOL announced today that it was forming a new organization called AOL Networks Sales & Solutions Division to handle the advertising, search and ecommerce revenues for the company. Headed by ex- Time Warner Global Marketing executive Michael J Kelley, the division will be run by a troika of experienced AOLers– David Lebow, who has overseen AOL’s shopping and ecommerce efforts to date; Michael Barrett, a key figure in AOL’s interactive marketing(read sales) group for the past two years, and Brendan Condon, who will be Senior Vice President, Finance and Administration, for the the new division.
The release says:” Mr. Lebow will have the title of Executive Vice President/General Manager, AOL Media Networks. He will oversee the management of partner and member-facing traffic and inventory across AOL’s properties; the development of media plans and research for partners advertising in those properties; marketing and events aimed at the advertising community; radio network development; AOL.COM; and Member Education. His group will also continue to use the AOL network of inventory to promote and increase usage of Company products including premium services, AOL for Broadband and others.”
And “Mr. Barrett has been named Executive Vice President, Sales and Partner Marketing, with responsibility for agency sales, partner sales, category sales, customer relations, sales training and specialist activities.”
In addition to managing the assets and inventory for all AOL-owned properties, from Mapquest, to Netscape.com, to ICQ, and so on, this group will continue to manage the advertising, search and ecommerce revenue for Time, Inc. and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. online properties.
Will this reorg do the trick? The leaders are all company insiders –and all guys–so there’s no question the company is feeling comfortable, and the centralized organization should offer improved efficiency of scale, but this group needs to be able to sell into the market, as well as stay in tune with the administration in Dulles–and a whole other set of players in New York.