In a world where Google and Yahoo are leaders, it will be interesting to see other large media and consumer experience cionglomerates with diversified product lines fight to get into the other sweet spots where ad dollars significantly flow.
If Jordan Rohan is correct, and Time Warner’s Dick Parsons never meant to sell AOL whole, just to build up interest and get better terms from Google, then one way to think about the recent turn of events is as a solid slap at the New York Times, another company that has been making a sustained and serious effort to grow into the portal ranks.
Not only did NYTimes buy About.com to grow their page views and diversify their platform, they bought it to further increase their consumption and targeted delivery of Google AdWords–putting them much close to AOL as Google’s biggest (and most preferred?) client.
So doesn’t a new (and presumably enhanced) AOL/Google deal shove the Times back down the food chain a bit–again?

In a world where Google and Yahoo are leaders, it will be interesting to see other large media and consumer experience cionglomerates with diversified product lines fight to get into the other sweet spots where ad dollars significantly flow.
If Jordan Rohan is correct, and Time Warner’s Dick Parsons never meant to sell AOL whole, just to build up interest and get better terms from Google, then one way to think about the recent turn of events is as a solid slap at the New York Times, another company that has been making a sustained and serious effort to grow into the portal ranks.
Not only did NYTimes buy About.com to grow their page views and diversify their platform, they bought it to further increase their consumption and targeted delivery of Google AdWords–putting them much close to AOL as Google’s biggest (and most preferred?) client.
So doesn’t a new (and presumably enhanced) AOL/Google deal shove the Times back down the food chain a bit–again?