Some observations about social media..and my own shifting use of it, right now.Back in the day, say 2005, blogging was the main way to do the following:

  • make your voice heard
  • be part of a community
  • establishe a reputation for your ideas
  • influence thought and community

Needless to say, in those days I loved the blogosphere and participated avidly in my corner(s) of it.

Fast forward 3 years and we have a much more bifurcated set of ways to communicate:

  • twitter–a great community tool–chatter with people you know and feel affinity with; be part of a virtual community
  • friendfeed-post your lifestream links, influence others through comments on their links, and be part of a community
  • blogging–all the of the above, but at a slower pace
  • tubmlr–all of the above, only visual
  • seesmic and 12seconds: join a visual video community

Point here is that I find myself using twitter to maintain community, blogging to share ideas and influence thought, and friendfeed for reputation (in that I take pride in the links I post and the comments I make on others’ streams).

What is interesting about all this is that the only one of these tools that is bi-directional for real–ie there is the ability to communicate in something more closely resembling real time–is twitter. (Thought video comments on seesmic are great). 

Everything else is a publish and subscribe model, which I think is becoming less powerful as watching and commenting on lifestreams (the friendfeed model, again) becomes a way to  mimic being bidirectional (and as friendfeed keeps speeding up their crawlers, may truly become bi-directional, which would be amazing)

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Some observations about social media..and my own shifting use of it, right now.Back in the day, say 2005, blogging was the main way to do the following:

  • make your voice heard
  • be part of a community
  • establishe a reputation for your ideas
  • influence thought and community

Needless to say, in those days I loved the blogosphere and participated avidly in my corner(s) of it.

Fast forward 3 years and we have a much more bifurcated set of ways to communicate:

  • twitter–a great community tool–chatter with people you know and feel affinity with; be part of a virtual community
  • friendfeed-post your lifestream links, influence others through comments on their links, and be part of a community
  • blogging–all the of the above, but at a slower pace
  • tubmlr–all of the above, only visual
  • seesmic and 12seconds: join a visual video community

Point here is that I find myself using twitter to maintain community, blogging to share ideas and influence thought, and friendfeed for reputation (in that I take pride in the links I post and the comments I make on others’ streams).

What is interesting about all this is that the only one of these tools that is bi-directional for real–ie there is the ability to communicate in something more closely resembling real time–is twitter. (Thought video comments on seesmic are great). 

Everything else is a publish and subscribe model, which I think is becoming less powerful as watching and commenting on lifestreams (the friendfeed model, again) becomes a way to  mimic being bidirectional (and as friendfeed keeps speeding up their crawlers, may truly become bi-directional, which would be amazing)

.