PolicyLInk releases: HEALTHY FOOD FOR ALL: BUILDING EQUITABLE AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS IN DETROIT AND OAKLAND

HEALTHY FOOD FOR ALL-8-19-09-FINAL.pdf, is a brand new new report by PolicyLink, the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food
Systems
at Michigan State University, and the Fair Food Network.about food systems and food distribution in Oakland, CA, where I live, and in Detroit, a city that is both falling apart and trying to reinvent the urban future.

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As someone who has mapped Oakland’s food systems for herself–all
the farmer’s markets, all the food pantries, all the supermarkets, the coops,
etc. I can tell you that not only do we have food deserts here–not that much
has changed in much of the city since this topic became an issue in 2004. This
new report–which I am reading now–offers up to the minute documentation and
details. The report also proposes solutions, including

  • Developing or attracting new neighborhood grocery stores
  • Expanding local food production through urban farms and
    community gardens
  • Enabling the use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
    Program (SNAP) benefits at farmers’ markets
  • Establishing food policy councils, as Oakland is now doing
  • Linking low-income residents to jobs and entrepreneurial
    opportunities in food businesses

More to come on this.