iMedia Connection’s exec editor, Brad Behrens, did the right thing and wrote a graceful editorial/clarification about the Bill Day piece–replete with ads from Bill’s company, WhenU, that they ran yesterday–and about posts Theresa Quintinalla and I wrote taking them to task.
Brad says they didn’t sell the edit, they have always wanted Bill to write for them, and when they realized it looked bad, they took the ads down.
Brad goes further and says they don’t sell edit, period–“…if somebody — anybody, even a sponsor — submits a byline for our consideration and the article turns out to be a veiled or overt commercial for the contributor’s company, then we don’t run it.”
Brad’s explanation works for me.
So does their quick response in addressing these issues.
The fact we can have this kind of dialogue–in public–is part of how the web has changed things and driven everyone to more transparency.

iMedia Connection’s exec editor, Brad Behrens, did the right thing and wrote a graceful editorial/clarification about the Bill Day piece–replete with ads from Bill’s company, WhenU, that they ran yesterday–and about posts Theresa Quintinalla and I wrote taking them to task.
Brad says they didn’t sell the edit, they have always wanted Bill to write for them, and when they realized it looked bad, they took the ads down.
Brad goes further and says they don’t sell edit, period–“…if somebody — anybody, even a sponsor — submits a byline for our consideration and the article turns out to be a veiled or overt commercial for the contributor’s company, then we don’t run it.”
Brad’s explanation works for me.
So does their quick response in addressing these issues.
The fact we can have this kind of dialogue–in public–is part of how the web has changed things and driven everyone to more transparency.