So, the WSJ article on blogger’s buzz has real timeliness for me; I’ve been brooding about how some folks I know–someone I will call Mickey (in honor of the Mouse), in particular, has done an amazing job building buzz for his as yet-unreleased start-up through an adroit mix of blogging and social networking.
Based on eyeballing Mickey’s skillful moves, here’s how an aspiring start-up founder, especially one eager to have a bigco pre-emptively acquire his company soon after launch–might play it today:
1) Move to/live in a technology center like Silicon Valley
2) Start a blog and write about other startups, technology buzz, tech news, and VC $$
3) Dabble in advising VCs and helping other start-ups get funded
4) NDA your friends and share your product concepts; tell everyone you are web 2.0 and/or disruptive
5) Build your blog influence as much as possible, through every means
6) Show up everywhere, at all sorts of conferences, parties, and events
7) Get your A-list pals to blog about you before, during, and after alpha release
8) Hire some of them as advisors; get free advice from the rest
9) Keep it moving by repeating #2-8 over and over (think of it as a spin release cycle)
10) Enjoy the huge buzz all those blog posts will generate and the free marketing and buzz you’ve so neatly engineered
How many new tech businesses have we seen spun in this way?
I can think of three companies–maybe four–who fit this bill without even giving it much thought.
New tech businesses that cause the same small Web 2.0 pack of boy bloggers to avidly pile onto the new, new thing and dissect it to death.
It’s hype, folks, pure and simple.
And if you play it, it plays you.

So, the WSJ article on blogger’s buzz has real timeliness for me; I’ve been brooding about how some folks I know–someone I will call Mickey (in honor of the Mouse), in particular, has done an amazing job building buzz for his as yet-unreleased start-up through an adroit mix of blogging and social networking.
Based on eyeballing Mickey’s skillful moves, here’s how an aspiring start-up founder, especially one eager to have a bigco pre-emptively acquire his company soon after launch–might play it today:
1) Move to/live in a technology center like Silicon Valley
2) Start a blog and write about other startups, technology buzz, tech news, and VC $$
3) Dabble in advising VCs and helping other start-ups get funded
4) NDA your friends and share your product concepts; tell everyone you are web 2.0 and/or disruptive
5) Build your blog influence as much as possible, through every means
6) Show up everywhere, at all sorts of conferences, parties, and events
7) Get your A-list pals to blog about you before, during, and after alpha release
8) Hire some of them as advisors; get free advice from the rest
9) Keep it moving by repeating #2-8 over and over (think of it as a spin release cycle)
10) Enjoy the huge buzz all those blog posts will generate and the free marketing and buzz you’ve so neatly engineered
How many new tech businesses have we seen spun in this way?
I can think of three companies–maybe four–who fit this bill without even giving it much thought.
New tech businesses that cause the same small Web 2.0 pack of boy bloggers to avidly pile onto the new, new thing and dissect it to death.
It’s hype, folks, pure and simple.
And if you play it, it plays you.