So, we’re not having what’s been the usual Friday am S he’s Geeky planning call this week.
Reason: The conference happened this past Monday and Tuesday.
Emails and notes are still coming to me, but I definitely want to share some of what I learned and observed.
First off, lessons about the women in tech community based on this conference experience:

  • There is a huge age diversity–Two retired women who were coders/programmers in the late 60’s/early 70’s came to the conference to see what women in tech were like today. There were women still in school, and just out of college, along with the twenty-thirty-forty-and fifty somethings.
  • Race and class and gender identity contribute to the mix–I saw more diversity around race and gender identity than at many conferences.
  • Feminism lives–especially in that third wave of younger women.
  • The impulse/need to connect is powerful–and there is some real pent-up demand to get outside one’s usual circles.
  • There is a spirit of sharing, acceptance, curiosity–but no bullshit, please, we’re time-deprived.
  • There’s definitely momentum to do this conference again–and again–in more locations as well as in the Bay area.

Observations about women at conference in aggregate:

  • Many people want mentoring–help and support from those further along the twisty path
  • Many want leadership and personal development–I think 40+ people came to the session I facilitated on “Owning Your Power” and the room was filled at the session the next day with Liza and Adina on Leadership development.
  • People are becoming self-employed and entrepreneurial at younger ages–and want support and guidance for uncharted paths.
  • Community really does matter.

Finally, I have to say that, as much as I beat myself up 100 times about my viability as a fund-raiser, or consistency as a planner, working with Kaliya and the organizing team was amazing. In many ways, while it took real solid work and time, this was one of the least stressful events I have ever worked on–the levels of communication and concensus were just so high among the team–and Kaliya and Laurie did amazing work in the background.

So, we’re not having what’s been the usual Friday am S he’s Geeky planning call this week.
Reason: The conference happened this past Monday and Tuesday.
Emails and notes are still coming to me, but I definitely want to share some of what I learned and observed.
First off, lessons about the women in tech community based on this conference experience:

  • There is a huge age diversity–Two retired women who were coders/programmers in the late 60’s/early 70’s came to the conference to see what women in tech were like today. There were women still in school, and just out of college, along with the twenty-thirty-forty-and fifty somethings.
  • Race and class and gender identity contribute to the mix–I saw more diversity around race and gender identity than at many conferences.
  • Feminism lives–especially in that third wave of younger women.
  • The impulse/need to connect is powerful–and there is some real pent-up demand to get outside one’s usual circles.
  • There is a spirit of sharing, acceptance, curiosity–but no bullshit, please, we’re time-deprived.
  • There’s definitely momentum to do this conference again–and again–in more locations as well as in the Bay area.

Observations about women at conference in aggregate:

  • Many people want mentoring–help and support from those further along the twisty path
  • Many want leadership and personal development–I think 40+ people came to the session I facilitated on “Owning Your Power” and the room was filled at the session the next day with Liza and Adina on Leadership development.
  • People are becoming self-employed and entrepreneurial at younger ages–and want support and guidance for uncharted paths.
  • Community really does matter.

Finally, I have to say that, as much as I beat myself up 100 times about my viability as a fund-raiser, or consistency as a planner, working with Kaliya and the organizing team was amazing. In many ways, while it took real solid work and time, this was one of the least stressful events I have ever worked on–the levels of communication and concensus were just so high among the team–and Kaliya and Laurie did amazing work in the background.