There’s nothing like having your very own personal experience illustrate the immediate power of the social graph–and the power of activity streams.

This morning,  I got the news I had been laid off from Yahoo! at about 11 am. Around noon I posted a note to my blog, a note to my Facebook status, and a tweet to my twitter stream.Â
By 5 pm, there were 44+ comments on my blog post, 21 comments on the FB note, 15 FB emails, 20 Yahoo emails and 20 Gmail emails. Plus perhaps 6 twitter-derived notes.Â
That’s over 100 responses generated within 6 hours of the actual occurrence. Â
To me, that’s amazing–and also a smaller scale, real time example of how quickly the social graph allows news to spread–and how easy it is now for people to communicate.
One interesting observation was that all the emails  received were from friends and colleagues and people I personally know, supporting the concept that email is an essentially 1:1 private medium (as in strangers are cautious about sending email). Â
In contrast, the people responding to me  were more diverse in their relationship to me.
 Many of the blog comments were from friends, but a significant percentage were from blog readers or people I have not meet face to face.Â
On FB, the wall and post comments ranged across friends, acquaintances, readers, with at least 50% from people I do not know well. Â To me, this illustrates that one aspect of the social graph is the desire and ability for people to demonstrate affinity and support with people they *like,* but may not know well in the real world, and yet feel connected to through blogging, twitter, etc.
Anyway, as I read through all the great notes, calls to action, and expressions of support–all of which I very much appreciate (and need/want) I was struck by how much social media tools provided this situation with what felt like  almost real time communications–and how much smaller and more intimate the world feels because of the speed and directness with which we can now interact when something happens.

There’s nothing like having your very own personal experience illustrate the immediate power of the social graph–and the power of activity streams.

This morning,  I got the news I had been laid off from Yahoo! at about 11 am. Around noon I posted a note to my blog, a note to my Facebook status, and a tweet to my twitter stream.Â
By 5 pm, there were 44+ comments on my blog post, 21 comments on the FB note, 15 FB emails, 20 Yahoo emails and 20 Gmail emails. Plus perhaps 6 twitter-derived notes.Â
That’s over 100 responses generated within 6 hours of the actual occurrence. Â
To me, that’s amazing–and also a smaller scale, real time example of how quickly the social graph allows news to spread–and how easy it is now for people to communicate.
One interesting observation was that all the emails  received were from friends and colleagues and people I personally know, supporting the concept that email is an essentially 1:1 private medium (as in strangers are cautious about sending email). Â
In contrast, the people responding to me  were more diverse in their relationship to me.
 Many of the blog comments were from friends, but a significant percentage were from blog readers or people I have not meet face to face.Â
On FB, the wall and post comments ranged across friends, acquaintances, readers, with at least 50% from people I do not know well. Â To me, this illustrates that one aspect of the social graph is the desire and ability for people to demonstrate affinity and support with people they *like,* but may not know well in the real world, and yet feel connected to through blogging, twitter, etc.
Anyway, as I read through all the great notes, calls to action, and expressions of support–all of which I very much appreciate (and need/want) I was struck by how much social media tools provided this situation with what felt like  almost real time communications–and how much smaller and more intimate the world feels because of the speed and directness with which we can now interact when something happens.