At least three people I know who were laid off at Yahoo! have either been rehired or interviewed for jobs there. It’s been interesting to watch that process and think about the very personal pros and cons of returning to a company that deemed you non-essential, only to offer you a spot eight weeks later.
For one of my friends, there was a chance to manage people and great promises for the future involved; for another, the lure was security and people he already had worked with before; for a third, it’s keeping options and benefits after years at the same firm.
For me, returning to Yahoo! right now would feel somewhere between complicated and impossible (no, I don’t have an offer). Some of the elements that made me thrilled to join are still there: good people, very large reach, tons of opportunity to capitalize on what they already have. But there’s the negatives: A company that might not have planned well in letting me–and so many others–go in the way they did, uncertainity about what can be accomplished as the inevitable acquisition continues to loom, questions about alignment and strategy of the senior teams beyond a piecemeal approach.
And then there’s the big one: Is there more, and better opportunity elsewhere? (Obviously, subjective, here.) For me, heads down with my team and my role for so long (except for a side stealth Brickhouse project that never got anywhere), getting laid off was one of those shoves that makes you reassess and look around with new eyes.
On that level, I’ve seen opportunities beyond Yahoo, whether I accept them or not, that make me think the sturm and drang I feel about the place just isn’t where I want my soul to live, and as much as I recall the high hopes I had when I started, there are better places for me to play those aspirations out, some of which I could never have imagined three months ago.

At least three people I know who were laid off at Yahoo! have either been rehired or interviewed for jobs there. It’s been interesting to watch that process and think about the very personal pros and cons of returning to a company that deemed you non-essential, only to offer you a spot eight weeks later.
For one of my friends, there was a chance to manage people and great promises for the future involved; for another, the lure was security and people he already had worked with before; for a third, it’s keeping options and benefits after years at the same firm.
For me, returning to Yahoo! right now would feel somewhere between complicated and impossible (no, I don’t have an offer). Some of the elements that made me thrilled to join are still there: good people, very large reach, tons of opportunity to capitalize on what they already have. But there’s the negatives: A company that might not have planned well in letting me–and so many others–go in the way they did, uncertainity about what can be accomplished as the inevitable acquisition continues to loom, questions about alignment and strategy of the senior teams beyond a piecemeal approach.
And then there’s the big one: Is there more, and better opportunity elsewhere? (Obviously, subjective, here.) For me, heads down with my team and my role for so long (except for a side stealth Brickhouse project that never got anywhere), getting laid off was one of those shoves that makes you reassess and look around with new eyes.
On that level, I’ve seen opportunities beyond Yahoo, whether I accept them or not, that make me think the sturm and drang I feel about the place just isn’t where I want my soul to live, and as much as I recall the high hopes I had when I started, there are better places for me to play those aspirations out, some of which I could never have imagined three months ago.