I am thinking about information vs. reporting, and how communication is power (think about twitter and how intensely it’s becoming the drug of choice for the digital, uh, elite inside the bell jar.)
Richard Sambrook of the BBC made a statement last week helped catalyze some ideas I’ve been thinking about about journalism, blogging, community and sustainability. Richard said (and this is a paraphrase): “In the future, what will matter is not objectivity, but accuracy.” In other words, the idea of reporting as a detached and objective priesthood will fall away, but readers will still want and need accuracy in the information they share.
Another way to look at this is that it’s not only knowledge that is power, it’s the ability to communicate. And how, for those who are not bloggers, do you give them the tools to do so?
I’m thinking about this alot in the context of local and community, in particular.
What are the places where local news, something there isn’t always enough of, in print and on the net(especially on the net) can actually be replace by local information? Where citizens can speak instead of journalists or even bloggers? (Not everyone wants to blog, folks.)
In other words, it is enough for an attendee at the school board meeting to file an account, or do you need a blogger or a journalist to do so? And what tools do each of them need?
To put it another way, when I look at some communities–like parts of Oakland–I see that their needs t communicate what’s happening there-between the locals and to the greater world–just aren’t met by the press. So how could it work in those communities if the goal was to provide more access to tools to spread more information? Would we see social change and improved quality of life? A more cohesive sense of community among particular groups? Between groups?
And how do you support–and teach–accuracy, anyway? Is BlogHer an example of creating vertical niche communities with power? Are there best practices there to transfer to local? Where are the differences?
I am really interested in this question of community, sustainability and value–if you have sites to point to, things you’ve read that will help me better understand information, news, community on a local or groups level, please post in the comments, or send them my way.

I am thinking about information vs. reporting, and how communication is power (think about twitter and how intensely it’s becoming the drug of choice for the digital, uh, elite inside the bell jar.)
Richard Sambrook of the BBC made a statement last week helped catalyze some ideas I’ve been thinking about about journalism, blogging, community and sustainability. Richard said (and this is a paraphrase): “In the future, what will matter is not objectivity, but accuracy.” In other words, the idea of reporting as a detached and objective priesthood will fall away, but readers will still want and need accuracy in the information they share.
Another way to look at this is that it’s not only knowledge that is power, it’s the ability to communicate. And how, for those who are not bloggers, do you give them the tools to do so?
I’m thinking about this alot in the context of local and community, in particular.
What are the places where local news, something there isn’t always enough of, in print and on the net(especially on the net) can actually be replace by local information? Where citizens can speak instead of journalists or even bloggers? (Not everyone wants to blog, folks.)
In other words, it is enough for an attendee at the school board meeting to file an account, or do you need a blogger or a journalist to do so? And what tools do each of them need?
To put it another way, when I look at some communities–like parts of Oakland–I see that their needs t communicate what’s happening there-between the locals and to the greater world–just aren’t met by the press. So how could it work in those communities if the goal was to provide more access to tools to spread more information? Would we see social change and improved quality of life? A more cohesive sense of community among particular groups? Between groups?
And how do you support–and teach–accuracy, anyway? Is BlogHer an example of creating vertical niche communities with power? Are there best practices there to transfer to local? Where are the differences?
I am really interested in this question of community, sustainability and value–if you have sites to point to, things you’ve read that will help me better understand information, news, community on a local or groups level, please post in the comments, or send them my way.